colony square

Colony Square Redevelopment Construction Site Accidents

Colony Square is getting close to completing its $400 million redevelopment project, which is set to wrap up by the spring of 2021. Originally opened in 1971, Colony Square was considered ahead of its time as Atlanta’s first “mixed use” office/retail development. But as time went on, it began to lose some of its appeal as it fell behind more modern retail trends.

Five years ago, the property, which is located at the corner of Peachtree and 14th St., was purchased by North American Properties. In 2017, work began on the multi-phase redevelopment project. The Colony Square makeover will include the addition of two new office buildings, new pedestrian paths, and an outdoor plaza that developers envision as a “living room” for Midtown Atlanta.

At over 10,000 square feet, the new outdoor green space can accommodate around 300 people with COVID-19 safety restrictions. When these restrictions are lifted, it will be able to accommodate about 1,000 people.

All in all, the new Colony Square will feature 940,000 square feet of office space, 160,000 square feet of restaurants, retail, and entertainment space, a luxury dine-in movie theater, 262 residences, and a 466-room hotel. Whole Foods will occupy a large chunk of the office space for its new regional headquarters, and Starbucks and Chick-fil-A will also be among its tenants.

Colony Square Construction Site Accident Dangers

The redevelopment of Colony Square is probably long overdue, and there is no doubt that the finished product will breathe a lot of new life into the Midtown Atlanta area. There will be some much-needed housing available, and the retail, entertainment, and office space will provide a lot of new jobs to those in the area. A lot of good construction jobs have also been made available as the phases of this project have been completed.

While all of these additions are great for the local economy, they do come with some inherent dangers. In particular, those who work on the construction of this project encounter a lot of hazards on the job every day. Workers in this industry put in long hours, and they are often under a lot of pressure to complete their tasks ahead of tight deadlines. And the pressure can become even more intense when rain and other inclement weather causes the schedule to be set back.

Construction workers face other hazardous conditions as well, such as working in high elevations and on tight and slippery surfaces. People in this industry also work frequently with heavy machinery, tools, and equipment, and when something goes wrong with any of these, it can result in serious injuries.

Construction companies and contractors are required to follow strict safety standards in order to protect their workers on the job site. However, according to OSHA, these standards are violated regularly by many in the industry. Some of the top OSHA violations that occur in construction include:

  • Fall Protection
  • Scaffolding
  • Ladder Safety Requirements
  • Machinery and Machine Guarding
  • Eye and Face Protection
  • Control of Hazardous Substances

When safety standards are not adhered to, construction site accidents become a greater possibility. Some of these accidents cause minor injuries, but far too many of them are severe and even fatal.

OSHA has identified four hazards in particular that account for approximately 60% of all construction accident fatalities:

  • Falls: About 1/3 of all construction-related deaths happen because of slips, trips, and falls. Slips and falls are all too common because of loose wiring, debris, and other objects that workers trip over. Serious falls can also happen sometimes when workers are up on ladders, scaffolds, roofs, and other high surfaces.
  • Struck By/Struck Against Events: About one out of every 10 construction accident fatalities happen because a worker gets struck by a hard object or thrown up against a hard surface. This can happen because of building materials or other objects that fall from one floor to another strike a worker, for example.
  • Electrical Injuries: Electrocutions account for roughly 8% of all construction worker deaths. A construction project requires a lot of electrical wiring to go into the structure before the finishing work is done. But when loose wiring is left unsecured, a worker can come in contact with it and suffer an electrical injury.
  • Caught In-Between/Crush Injuries: Around 5% of construction fatalities are caused by caught in-between events where a worker can get trapped in a small area and crushed.

In addition to the fatal four, there are several other types of injuries that commonly happen on construction job sites, including:

  • Exposure to toxic substances
  • Gas leaks, fires, and explosions
  • Tool and machinery accidents
  • Crane and hoist accidents
  • Elevator shaft accidents
  • Forklift accidents
  • Repetitive stress injuries
  • Motor vehicle accidents

Midtown Atlanta Construction Site Accident Claims

Injured construction workers usually look to their employer’s workers’ compensation policy for coverage to pay for their injury. This is a good place to start, but it is usually not the only legal avenue available when a worker gets hurt at a construction site.

It is important to understand that, while workers’ comp is a no-fault program, there are strict limitations on benefits. For example, this program will only pay for up to two thirds of lost earnings, and you may be required to go to certain healthcare providers in order to get your medical bills paid. On top of all this, there is no compensation available for the intangible losses a worker suffers, such as pain and suffering and emotional distress.

Our attorneys look beyond workers’ comp to identify any outside parties that could be responsible for the construction site accident. For example, maybe the owner of the property failed to address all known hazards and take other reasonable measures to ensure that the area was safe to work in. Or maybe the injury was caused by a defective piece of machinery that malfunctioned while the worker was using it.

Every circumstance is unique, and a thorough investigation is needed to identify the cause of the accident and who was responsible. If it turns out that a party other than the employer can be held liable, then the construction worker can file a personal injury claim against the at-fault party. This allows them to recover damages for the physical and emotional pain-and-suffering they had to endure.

Injured in a Construction Accident in Fulton County? Contact Bailey, Javins & Carter, L.C. for Legal Help

If you or someone close to you got hurt in a construction accident anywhere in the Atlanta area, contact Bailey, Javins & Carter, L.C. for assistance. We will meet with you to go over your case and advise you of your legal rights and options. To get started, call our office today at 678-981-5370 or send us an online message to schedule your free consultation.